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Unconventional Job Hunting Tips for Teens

Category : Teen Job Guidance

While I haven’t been a teenager in many years, I can still remember begging my parents for money. Seeing the latest movie, playing the latest videogames, they all required money; which I didn’t have. Therefore, I started my first job when I was 15 and have never looked back.

However, getting a job at 15 wasn’t the easiest endeavor. I didn’t want to be the stereotypical teenager delivering your newspaper or flipping your burgers. So I began hunting for non-traditional jobs. This required some ingenuity on my part though.

Here are three unconventional job tips for teenagers in need of employment:

Put Passions Aside

I’m sure at some point in your life, your parents or a school counselor has told you to “follow your passion.” In other words, pursue jobs and career paths that lead you to your dream job. What if I told you that this is poor advice?

As a teenager, chances are good that your passions can change. For example, when I was 16 I wanted to be an architect because that is what interested me. Ten years later, I am now the proud owner of a vegetarian restaurant and I couldn’t be happier. In fact, most folks who actually enjoy their job didn’t get there by pursuing their passion(s).

Sell Yourself

When an employer wants to hire someone, it is because there is a problem that needs to be fixed. As a job seeker, you want to sell yourself as the solution to fix that problem. This is especially true during a job interview. If you were asked to come in for an interview, it is because an employer saw something in you. Use this knowledge to highlight your strengths and positive attributes.

Even before landing an interview, you can take proactive measures to promote yourself as a competent, hard worker deserving of a job. Business cards, pens, and little trinkets branded with your contact information work wonders for exposure. Most of these promotional items can be purchased and customized through Quality Logo Products. These items can be left just about anywhere, but they are highly effective when included with a resume.

Go Beyond the Application

If you’re like me then you lack the attention span to spend countless hours sifting through a plethora of job boards. Moreover, the act of filling out an application has become a meticulous and lengthy endeavor. Instead of filling out an application the instant you find it, hold off for just a moment.

Once you find a position you’re interested, take note of the company name and contact details. Do some research on the company and identify their administrative staff. You can typically find a personal email or phone number for a high-level—CEO, supervisor, general manager, etc.—member of that company’s management structure. Reach out to one of these people and introduce yourself.

Nine times out of ten, you can find out more about the job you’re interested in. Because you have already spoken with someone and introduced yourself, your application doesn’t appear as a stack of resumes. Instead, someone knows who you are and why you’re potentially a great candidate for hire.


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